Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Sleep Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Jun 17, 2014 - 10:44:03 AM



Don’t Ignore the Snore: Snoring May Be Early Sign of Future Health Risks

By Staff Editor
Jun 17, 2014 - 10:40:03 AM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - DETROIT - Here's a wake-up call for snorers: Snoring may put you at a greater risk than those who are overweight, smoke or have high cholesterol to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery, according to a study published by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

The increased thickening in the lining of the two large blood vessels that supply the brain with oxygenated blood is a precursor to atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries responsible for many vascular diseases.

"Snoring is more than a bedtime annoyance and it shouldn't be ignored. Patients need to seek treatment in the same way they would if they had sleep apnea, high blood pressure or other risk factors for cardiovascular disease," says lead study author Robert Deeb, M.D., with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford.

"Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that isolated snoring may not be as benign as first suspected. So instead of kicking your snoring bed partner out of the room or spending sleepless nights elbowing him or her, seek out medical treatment for the snorer."

The study reveals changes in the carotid artery with snorers - even for those without sleep apnea - likely due to the trauma and subsequent inflammation caused by the vibrations of snoring.

Study results are published in the June issue of The Laryngoscope journal and the article is available online.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) - a sleep disorder that occurs due to the collapse of the airway in the throat during sleep and causes loud snoring and periodic pauses in breathing - has long been linked to cardiovascular disease, along with a host of other serious health issues.

But the risk for cardiovascular disease may actually begin with snoring, long before it becomes OSA. Until now, there was little evidence in humans to show a similar connection between snoring and cardiovascular risk.

For the Henry Ford study, Dr. Deeb and senior study author Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., reviewed data for 913 patients who had been evaluated by the institution's sleep center.

Patients, ages 18-50, who had participated in a diagnostic sleep study between December 2006 and January 2012 were included in the study. None of the participants had sleep apnea.

In all, 54 patients completed the snore outcomes survey regarding their snoring habits, as well as underwent a carotid artery duplex ultrasound to measure the intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries.

Carotid intima-media thickness, a measurement of the thickness of the innermost two layers of the arterial wall, may be used to detect the presence and to track the progression of atherosclerotic disease. Intima-media thickness is the first sign of carotid artery disease.

Compared to non-snorers, snorers were found to have a significantly greater intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries, the study finds.

The study also revealed no statistically significant differences in intima-media thickness for patients with or without some of the traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease - smoking, diabetes, hypertension or hypercholesterolemia.

"Snoring is generally regarded as a cosmetic issue by health insurance, requiring significant out-of-pocket expenses by patients. We're hoping to change that thinking so patients can get the early treatment they need, before more serious health issues arise."

The Henry Ford research team plans to conduct another long-term study on this topic, particularly to determine if there's an increased incidence of cardiovascular events in patients who snore.

Along with Drs. Deeb and Yaremchuk, Henry Ford study co-authors are Paul Judge, M.D.; Ed Peterson, Ph.D.; and Judith C. Lin, M.D.

Funding: Henry Ford Hospital

###

For advertising/promotion on HealthNewsDigest.comcontact Mike McCurdy at 877-634-9180 or [email protected]  We have 7,000 journalists as subscribers.



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Sleep Issues
Latest Headlines


+ Helping Parents Understand Infant Sleep Patterns
+ Alcohol Interferes With Body’s Ability To Regulate Sleep
+ Your Sleeping Position, Decoded: Sleep More Soundly Tonight & Live a Pain-Free Life!
+ No Sedative Necessary: Scientists Discover New “sleep node” in the Brain
+ Insomnia: Do You Need Help?
+ Sleep Education Program Spurs Preschoolers to Snooze 30 minutes Longer at Night
+ Don’t Ignore the Snore: Snoring May Be Early Sign of Future Health Risks
+ Half of Pregnant Women Who Have Hypertension and Snore Unknowingly Have a Sleep Disorder
+ 10 Tips for Better Sleep
+ Let Sleep Burn Away Brain Fog



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions