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Influenza Issues Author: Center for Disease Control Last Updated: Jan 24, 2013 - 12:09:02 PM



New Norovirus Strain Causing Most Norovirus Outbreaks in United States

By Center for Disease Control
Jan 24, 2013 - 12:09:12 PM



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Not yet known if strain will cause more outbreaks than previous years

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - A new strain of norovirus called GII.4 Sydney was the leading cause of norovirus outbreaks in the United States from September to December 2012, according to a study published inMorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The new strain was detected in Australia in March 2012, and caused outbreaks in that country and several other countries.

CDC researchers analyzed 2012 data collected through CaliciNet on norovirus strains associated with outbreaks in the United States. They found that of the 266 norovirus outbreaks reported during the last four months of 2012, 141 were caused by the GII.4 Sydney strain.

"The new strain spread rapidly across the United States from September to December 2012," said Dr. Aron Hall, epidemiologist, CDC's Division of Viral Diseases (DVD). "The proportion of reported outbreaks caused by this strain increased dramatically from 19 percent in September to 58 percent in December."

Norovirus is very contagious. In the United States, norovirus is the number one cause of acute gastroenteritis, which leads to diarrhea and vomiting. Each year, more than 21 million people in the United States get infected and develop acute gastroenteritis; approximately 800 die. Young children and elderly adults have the highest risk for severe illness.

Norovirus spreads primarily from infected people to others through direct contact. It also spreads through contaminated food, water, and surfaces. Norovirus infections are common during this time of the year. Most outbreaks occur from November to April, and activity usually peaks in January.

"New norovirus strains often lead to more outbreaks but not always," said Dr. Jan Vinjé, director of CaliciNet. Over the past decade, new strains of GII.4 have emerged about every 2 to 3 years. "We found that the new GII.4 Sydney strain replaced the previously predominant GII.4 strain."

Better surveillance in the United States and abroad have helped to detect new strains of norovirus sooner. Early identification of new strains helps to alert the public and health professionals to better prevent infections and control outbreaks.

Health professionals should remain vigilant to potential increases in norovirus infection this season due to GII.4 Sydney. They should follow standard prevention and control measures for norovirus. People should know that the best ways to help prevent norovirus infection include washing hands with soap and water, disinfecting surfaces, rinsing fruits and vegetables, cooking shellfish thoroughly, and not preparing food or caring for others while ill.

"Right now, it's too soon to tell whether the new strain of norovirus will lead to more outbreaks than in previous years. However, CDC continues to work with state partners to watch this closely and see if the strain is associated with more severe illness," said Dr. Hall. 

For more information on norovirus, visit CDC's norovirus Web site atwww.cdc.gov/norovirus.

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money through prevention. Whether these threats are global or domestic, chronic or acute, curable or preventable, natural disaster or deliberate attack, CDC is the nation's health protection agency.

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