Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Alcoholism Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Sep 7, 2017 - 10:06:33 PM



Exposure to Alcohol Before Birth May Make Drinking More Appealing to Teens

By Staff Editor
May 19, 2017 - 10:10:57 AM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Bethesda, Md. —A new study suggests that fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) reduces the taste system’s responsiveness to the bitter flavor and burning sensation of many varieties of alcoholic beverages. These factors make alcohol unappealing to some people, but, for reasons that are unclear, are less of a deterrent in young people exposed to alcohol before birth. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology.

Previous studies have found that FAE reduces the sense of smell of alcohol and that teens exposed to alcohol in utero have an increased risk of alcohol abuse. “It is possible that FAE makes the flavor of alcohol less aversive. This could increase the risk of adolescents experimenting with alcohol and developing a pattern of abuse,” the research team wrote.

The researchers compared oral sensory responses to alcohol and its flavor components, namely bitter (quinine), sweet (sugar) and burning and irritation (capsaicin and mustard oil) in an adolescent rat model of FAE and control rats. They recorded responses from two nerves that convey input about taste to the brain and one nerve that conveys input about oral burning and irritation to the brain (trigeminal nerve).

Compared with control rats, the taste nerves of FAE rats showed weaker responses to alcohol and quinine taste during adolescence. The reduced responses of these taste nerves to quinine persisted into adulthood, implying lifelong alterations in bitter taste function. The FAE rats also had reduced trigeminal responses to alcohol, capsaicin and mustard oil during adolescence.

“Our results demonstrate that FAE reprograms development of the rat’s peripheral taste and trigeminal systems,” the research team wrote. More study is needed to determine exactly how alcohol exposure before birth reprograms different parts of the nervous system, the researchers noted. The article, “Fetal alcohol exposure reduces responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal chemosensory neurons to ethanol and its flavor components,” is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 10,500 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

###



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Alcoholism Issues
Latest Headlines


+ Ibuprofen May Block Damage From Fetal-Alcohol Exposure
+ Human Genetic Variation Influences Alcohol’s Sedating and Stimulating
+ Simple Blood Test Identifies Critically Ill Patients Who Misuse Alcohol, Study Finds
+ Energy Drinks Influence Alcohol-Induced Body Imbalance
+ Marijuana and Alcohol Negatively Impact Lifetime Achievement in Young Adults
+ Early Age of Drinking Leads to Neurocognitive and Neuropsychological Damage
+ Drinking During Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Taboo, Tolerated, and Treasured
+ There Is No Safe Amount of Alcohol During Pregnancy, New Study Shows
+ A Lower Blood Alcohol Concentration Limit of .05 Could Save 1,790 Lives Per Year in the United States
+ The Increasing Cost of Alcohol Abuse



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions