Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

ADHD Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Sep 7, 2017 - 10:06:33 PM



Lead Exposure Linked to ADHD in Kids With Genetic Mutation

By Staff Editor
Jan 7, 2016 - 2:59:01 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Exposure to miniscule amounts of lead may contribute to ADHD symptoms in children who have a particular gene mutation, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

"This research is valuable to the scientific community as it bridges genetic and environmental factors and helps to illustrate one possible route to ADHD. Further, it demonstrates the potential to ultimately prevent conditions like ADHD by understanding how genes and environmental exposures combine," says lead researcher Joel Nigg, professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the OHSU School of Medicine.

To conduct this research, Nigg and colleagues evaluated lead blood level in 386 healthy children aged 6 to 17. Half of the children had been carefully diagnosed with ADHD. All children were within the safe lead exposure range as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the blood lead level in the sample was typical of the national U.S. population of children.

The analysis showed a heightened association between lead exposure and ADHD symptoms - particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity - in those with the HFE C282Y gene mutation, present in approximately 10 percent of US children.

"Because the C282Y gene helps to control the effects of lead in the body and the mutation was spread randomly in the children, the findings of our study are difficult to explain unless lead is, in fact, part of the cause of ADHD, not just an association," explained Nigg.

The study also found that lead effects were more robust in males, which is consistent with previous research specific to neurodevelopmental conditions and gender. Children without HFE C282Y mutations showed amplified symptoms as lead exposure increased, but not as consistently.

The scientists do not purport that lead is the only cause of ADHD symptoms, nor does the research indicate that lead exposure will guarantee an ADHD diagnosis; rather, the study demonstrates that environmental pollutants, such as lead, do play a role in the explanation of ADHD.

Despite U.S. government regulations that drastically reduced environmental exposure to lead, the neurotoxin is still found in common objects such as children's toys and costume jewelry, and continues to be ingested in small amounts via water from aging pipes, as well as contaminated soil and dust.

"Our findings put scientists one step closer to understanding this complex disorder so that we may provide better clinical diagnoses and treatment options and, eventually, learn to prevent it," says Nigg.

###

For advertising/promo rates, contact Mike McCurdy at 877-634-1980 or [email protected]

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

ADHD
Latest Headlines


+ Helping Children with ADHD Thrive in the Classroom
+ Brain Imaging Reveals ADHD as a Collection of Different Disorders
+ Keeping Harsh Punishment in Check Helps Kids with ADHD
+ Neurofeedback as an Alternative to Medication for ADHD
+ Children with ADHD Likely to Have Touch-Processing Abnormalities
+ Back-to-School Tips for Parents of Children with Autism, ADHD
+ UF Study Raises Questions About Overmedicating Young Children Diagnosed with ADHD
+ Motor Vehicle Crash Risk for Teens with ADHD Much Lower than Previously Reported
+ Cannabis Extracts Associated With Reduced ADHD Symptoms
+ Athletes with ADHD More Likely to Choose Team Sports, Could Increase Injury Risk



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions