Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Women's Health Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Feb 3, 2014 - 10:52:55 AM



7 Lifestyle Changes That Can Save Women from Heart Disease

By Staff Editor
Feb 3, 2014 - 10:47:42 AM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - NEW YORK, NY - February 3, 2014 -- Nearly half a million women die every year of heart disease and stroke, yet women continue to lag behind in their understanding of this disease and how it affects them. In fact, in the last decade younger women ages 35-44 have experienced the greatest increase in deaths caused by heart disease.

Dr. Holly Andersen director of education and outreach at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and Dr. Jennifer Haythe, a cardiologist at the Center for Advanced Cardiac Care at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, offer women seven simple steps to reduce their risk of developing heart disease.

Here are seven things women can do every day to decrease heart disease risk:
1.    Take a break. Stress is a leading contributor to heart disease and stroke. Take a deep breath, laugh, stretch, or meditate at least twice a day to relieve stress.  Remember, people who focus on the part of the glass that is half-full live longer with less disease.

2.    Get up and move. Walking for 20-30 minutes a day can be a lifesaver. Just getting your heart rate up for this long can reduce your risk of premature death by 50 percent or more.

3.    Put down the cigarette. The single best thing you can do for your health is to stop smoking. Even smoking just a few cigarettes a day more than doubles your risk of heart disease. Your risk begins to fall within a few months after you quit and returns to the level of nonsmokers within 3 to 5 years regardless of the amount smoked.

4.    Just say NO to fast foods. Most people think of ice cream, French fries and donuts as comfort foods, but they are actually working against you. These processed foods are loaded with salt and ingredients such as high-fructose corn syrup that drain you of energy and speed up the aging process. Consuming less salt is a good idea overall to decrease your risk of heart disease.

5.    Get on the Mediterranean diet. This means eating primarily fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts; replacing butter with a healthy fat such as olive oil; using herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor your food; eating red meat a few times a month and eating fish and poultry at least twice a week. You can also drink red wine in moderation if you like.

6.    Get a good night's sleep. You should try to sleep an average of 7-8 hours every night. Lack of sleep increases your blood pressure, induces stress, increases your appetite and slows down your metabolism

7.    Listen to your body. A 2010 American Heart Association Survey found that just over half of American women would call 911 if they believed they were having a heart attack. Put yourself first and call 911 if you think you are having a heart attack. .

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, based in New York City, is one of the nation's largest and most comprehensive hospitals, with some 2,600 beds. In 2012, the Hospital had nearly 2 million inpatient and outpatient visits, including 12,758 deliveries and 275,592 visits to its emergency departments. NewYork-Presbyterian's 6,144 affiliated physicians and 20,154 staff provide state-of-the-art inpatient, ambulatory and preventive care in all areas of medicine at six major centers: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, NewYork-Presbyterian/The Allen Hospital, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Westchester Division and NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. One of the most comprehensive health care institutions in the world, the Hospital is committed to excellence in patient care, research, education and community service. NewYork-Presbyterian is the #1 hospital in the New York metropolitan area and is consistently ranked among the best academic medical institutions in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. The Hospital has academic affiliations with two of the nation's leading medical colleges: Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. For more information, visitwww.nyp.org.

#       #        #

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Women's Health
Latest Headlines


+ When a Mood Swing Signals Trouble
+ Past Sexual Assault Triples Risk of Future Assault for College Women
+ The High Cost of Hot Flashes: Millions in Lost Wages Preventable
+ Primary Care Physicians Can be Critical Resource for Abused Women in Rural Areas
+ New FDA Action Plan Will Help Close the Health Care Disparities Gap for Women and Minorities
+ Women Will Benefit from the Affordable Care Act's Contraceptive Coverage
+ White Heterosexual Women Leading Surge in Infertility Treatments
+ Women Who 'Lean In' Often Soon Leave Engineering Careers
+ Love Your Thighs with 5 Cellulite Solutions
+ New Fertility Drug to be More Effective than One Used for the Past 40 Years



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions