Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Teen Health Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Nov 29, 2012 - 7:11:02 AM



Teens In Arts Report Depressive Symptoms

By Staff Editor
Nov 20, 2012 - 8:41:08 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page
(HealthNewsDigest.com) - WASHINGTON – Teens who participate in after-school arts activities such as music, drama and painting are more likely to report feeling depressed or sad than students who are not involved in these programs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

This is the first study to find that young people’s casual involvement in the arts could be linked to depressive symptoms, according to the researchers. The article was published online in APA’s journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts.

"This is not to say that depression is a necessary condition for either a teen or an adult to become an artist, nor are we showing that participating in the arts leads to mental illness,” said lead author Laura N. Young, MA, of Boston College. "However, previous research has revealed higher rates of mental illness symptoms in adult artists. We were interested in whether this association is present earlier in development."

While girls were more likely to take part in the arts after school and reported somewhat higher rates of depression than boys, the study found that both boys and girls involved in arts reported more depressive symptoms than those who were not involved in extracurricular arts activities.

Teens involved exclusively in sports were the least likely to report depressive symptoms. However, there was no difference in depressive symptoms between teens involved in the arts who also did sports and teens involved in the arts who did not also participate in sports. This suggests that arts participation rather than a lack of sports participation was associated with depression, the authors said.

The researchers looked at American teenagers' involvement in extracurricular activities in 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 using data from the U.S. Longitudinal Survey of Youth collected from 2,482 students 15 to 16 years old. Of the sample, 1,238 were female, 27 percent were black, 19 percent were Hispanic and 54 percent were non-Hispanic whites.

The students responded to survey questions asking how often they participated in “lessons in music, art or drama, or practice of music, singing, drama, drawing/painting” and “going to sports lessons, playing sports or practicing any physical activity” after school. Answers could range from “often” to “almost never,” the study said.

To determine rates of depressive symptoms, the survey asked teens how often they experienced various moods or problems associated with depression, such as poor appetite, difficulty concentrating, downcast mood, lack of energy or motivation, restless sleep and sadness. Their answers could range from “none of the time” to “all of the time.”

As for why there appears to be a link between the arts and symptoms of mental illness, one theory the authors presented is that people drawn to the arts may have certain cognitive traits, such as taking in a higher than average level of information from their surroundings. While dealing with excessive stimuli could lead to general distress and depression, a heightened awareness of self and surroundings could lead to greater creativity and artistic expression, the authors said. Personality traits such as introversion, which has been linked to depression, could also lead to preferences for more solitary activities that are more likely to be associated with practice of the arts than with sports, they said.

"When positive behaviors such as being involved in the arts are associated with symptoms of mental illness, it’s essential that we understand why,” said Young. “Further research can address the question of whether potential psychological vulnerabilities can be transformed into strengths through the practice of the arts."

Article: "Heightened Incidence of Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents Involved in the Arts;” Laura N. Young, MA; Ellen Winner, PhD; and Sara Cordes, PhD; Boston College; Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, online Nov. 12, 2012.
Full text of the article is available from the APA Public Affairs Office and at
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/aca-ofp-young.pdf

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and is the world's largest association of psychologists. APA's membership includes more than 137,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

###

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com please contact Mike McCurdy: [email protected] or 877-634-9180
HealthNewsDigest.com is syndicated worldwide, to thousands of journalists in all media, and health-related websites. www.HealthNewsDigest.com

Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Teen Health
Latest Headlines


+ Teens Prescribed Anti-Anxiety or Sleep Medications More Likely to Abuse Those Drugs Illegally
+ Future Family and Career Goals Evident in Teenage Years
+ Teens And Tires: What They Don’t Know Can Hurt Them
+ Schedule Your Preteen’s Health Check-up
+ Researchers Identify Potential Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Young Girls
+ A Survival Guide to Parenting Teens
+ Tips on Preparing Teens for College
+ To Help Keep Teen Drivers Safe, Focus On The Learner Period, New Research Finds
+ 8 Ways to Help Your Teen Survive a Breakup (Video)
+ FDA's Read the Label Youth Outreach Campaign Empowers 'Tweens' to Make Healthy Choices



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions