From HealthNewsDigest.com

Surgery
New Surgical Technique for Removing Inoperable Tumors of the Abdomen
By
May 1, 2012 - 12:04:37 PM

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Abdominal tumors involving both roots of the celiac and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) are deemed unresectable by conventional surgical methods, as removal would cause necrosis of the organs that are supplied by those blood vessels.

A case report published in the journal American Journal of Transplantation presents a novel surgical technique that enables surgeons to remove tumors that are unresectable by the usual surgical techniques.

Led by Tomoaki Kato, MD, FACS, of Columbia University, surgeons removed tumors in 3 patients involving both the celiac artery and SMA using new surgical techniques never performed before, known as “ex vivo” surgery where the organs are removed to do surgery.

First, surgeons removed entire abdominal organs together with the tumor. The patient is “organless” during this period. The tumor was cut and blood vessels were reconstructed using synthetic vascular grafts. Surgeons then re-implanted the organs back into the patient’s abdomen, connecting blood vessels and gastrointestinal tracts.

Surgery was successful, and all 3 patients are alive with no tumor recurrence to date after 2 to 4 years from the surgery.

“Our technique appears both feasible and effective in the proper clinical situation when performed by a multidisciplinary team experienced in multivisceral transplantation,” Kato notes. “This technique can expand the role of transplant surgery in specific oncological problem, and more patients with ‘inoperable’ tumors can be operated.”

This study is published in the American Journal of Transplantation. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact [email protected]
Full citation: Kato et al. Multivisceral Ex Vivo Surgery for Tumors Involving . American Journal of Transplantation 2012; DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2011.03945.x
URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2011.03945.x

About the Author: Tomoaki Kato, MD, FACS, is Surgical director of liver and intestinal transplantation at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and chief of Abdominal Organ Transplantation and professor of surgery at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
To arrange an interview with the Author, please contact Amy Pietzak, New York-Presbyterian Public Relations, at [email protected]

About the Journal:
American Journal of Transplantation (AJT) is the official journal of the American Society of Transplantation (AST) and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS). This #1 ranked transplantation journal serves as a forum for debate and re-assessment and is a major new platform for promoting understanding, improving results and advancing science in this dynamic field. Published monthly, AJT provides an essential resource for researchers and clinicians around the world. AJT is now also accessible via its free mobile app for smartphones. Find out more at www.amjtrans.com.

About Wiley-Blackwell:
Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world’s leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or our online platform, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world’s most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

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