Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Stroke Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Dec 18, 2013 - 3:15:32 PM



Mayo Clinic Researcher to Grow Human Cells in Space to Test Treatment for Stroke

By Staff Editor
Dec 18, 2013 - 3:12:45 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., believes that cells grown in the International Space Station (ISS) could help patients recover from a stroke, and that it may even be possible to generate human tissues and organs in space. He just needs a chance to demonstrate the possibility.

VIDEO ALERT: Video resources including an interview with Dr. Zubair describing the study can be found on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

He now has it. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), a nonprofit organization that promotes research aboard the ISS, has awarded Dr. Zubair a $300,000 grant to send human stem cells into space to see if they grow more rapidly than stem cells grown on Earth.

Dr. Zubair, medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Florida, says the experiment will be the first one Mayo Clinic has conducted in space and the first to use these human stem cells, which are found in bone marrow.

"On Earth, we face many challenges in trying to grow enough stem cells to treat patients," he says. "It now takes a month to generate enough cells for a few patients. A clinical-grade laboratory in space could provide the answer we all have been seeking for regenerative medicine."

He specifically wants to expand the population of stem cells that will induce regeneration of neurons and blood vessels in patients who have suffered a hemorrhagic stroke, the kind of stroke which is caused by blood clot. Dr. Zubair already grows such cells in his Mayo Clinic laboratory using a large tissue culture and several incubators - but only at a snail's pace.

Experiments on Earth using microgravity have shown that stem cells - the master cells that produce all organ and tissue cell types - will grow faster, compared to conventionally grown cells.

"If you have a ready supply of these cells, you can treat almost any condition, and can theoretically regenerate entire organs using a scaffold," Dr. Zubair says. "Additionally, they don't need to come from individual patients - anyone can use them without rejection."

Dr. Zubair is working with engineers at the University of Colorado who are building the specialized cell bioreactor that will be taken to the ISS within a year for the experiment.

"I don't really think growing cells in space for clinical use on Earth is science fiction," he says. "Commercial flights to the ISS will start soon, and the cost of traveling there is coming down. We just need to show what can be achieved in space, and this award from CASIS helps us do that."

###

About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first." More than 3,700 physicians, scientists and researchers, and 50,100 allied health staff work at Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn; Jacksonville, Fla; and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota., western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa. These locations treat more than half a million people each year. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visitwww.mayo.edu.

###

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Stroke Issues
Latest Headlines


+ ER Doctors Commonly Miss More Strokes Among Women, Minorities and Younger Patients
+ UT Southwestern Certified as Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center
+ Treat a Mini-stroke as Seriously as a Big One
+ Artery-clearing Surgery After Stroke Should be Delayed
+ Heart Attacks, Stroke at Work Often Follow Vigorous Physical Activity
+ Treating Stroke Patients with Intravenous Magnesium within an Hour of Symptom Onset Fails to Improve Stroke Outcome
+ Weather Changes May be Linked to Stroke Hospitalizations
+ Stroke Trigger More Deadly for African-Americans
+ Calcium Measurement and Prediction of Heart Attack or Stroke
+ Daily Low-dose Aspirin Can Prevent Heart Attack and Stroke but is Often Misused



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions