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Safety Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Sep 7, 2017 - 10:06:33 PM



Getting Out Your Lawn Mower: Safety Tips To Remember

By Staff Editor
Apr 10, 2017 - 2:33:32 PM



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(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Spring is on its way and home owners are eager to get out their lawn mowers and start planting, trimming and sprucing. Before you fire up your outdoor power equipment, look over these smart tips.

“We know everyone is eager to get outside and start working in their yards. But remember to keep safety in mind,” said Kris Kiser, president and CEO of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), an international trade association representing more than 100 power equipment, engine and utility vehicle manufacturers and suppliers.

“Doing some basic maintenance will ensure your equipment operates safely and gets the job done,” said Kiser.

Before you use a mower, trimmer, blower, chain saw, pruner or other piece of outdoor power equipment this season, OPEI says, remember to inspect the equipment, review owner’s manuals, and review safety procedures. Here are tips to help:

1. Get out your owner’s manual. Follow all guidelines for your outdoor power equipment and familiarize yourself with the controls. If you have lost your manual, look it up online.

2. Inspect your equipment. Check for loose belts and missing or damaged parts. Replace any parts needed or take your equipment to a qualified service representative.

3. Drain old fuel. Don’t leave fuel sitting in the tank for more than 30 days. Untreated gasoline (without a fuel stabilizer) left in the system will deteriorate, which may cause starting or running problems and, in some cases, damage to the fuel system.

4. Use only E10 or less fuel. Some gas stations may offer 15 percent ethanol (E15) gas or higher ethanol fuel blends, but any fuel containing more than 10 percent ethanol can damage—and is illegal to use in—small engine equipment not designed for it.

5. Label your fuel can with the date of purchase and ethanol content of the fuel. Never put “old” gas in your outdoor power equipment. If you don’t know the date of purchase, dispose of the fuel in the can safely and buy fresh fuel.

6. Clean your equipment. Remove any dirt, oil or grass stuck to it. A clean machine will run more efficiently and last longer.

“Now is also a good time to assess your outdoor power equipment needs,” adds Kiser. “Whether you’re needing battery-, gasoline-, propane-, diesel- or hybrid-powered equipment, there is a product to fit you and any job.”

Learn More

For more safety tips, go to www.opei.org. For further information on proper fueling, go to www.LookBeforeYouPump.com.

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