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News : National Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Aug 11, 2014 - 3:53:28 PM



The Rise of Tattoo Removal

By Staff Editor
Aug 11, 2014 - 3:49:06 PM



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(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Just as it was beginning to seem that nearly everyone you knew or met had at least one tattoo, the trend is beginning to head in the opposite direction with tattoo removal procedures growing rapidly in recent years. In fact, the tattoo removal industry as a whole has grown by 440% just in the past decade, becoming almost as common of a process as getting receiving a tattoo has become. The tattoo removal industry has experienced a strong year in revenue in 2014 already, with estimates reaching approximately $3.4 billion as millions of people seek to remove a mark they've grown to regret.

There are many reasons that almost as many people who get tattoos in the first place come to find themselves seeking a full removal. A popular reason for getting a tattoo among celebrities and average Americans alike is to showcase a physical attachment, devotion or relationship status, an unfortunately, many of these relationships don't last as long as the tattoo does. Teenagers have been some of the most enthusiastic recipients of tattoos in recent years and often their choices in permanent body ink tastes and preferences change dramatically as they enter adulthood.

The age demographic most common for seeking tattoo removal procedures are the 30-40 year old demographic who no longer seem to find the same things appealing that once promoted such passion in their 20's. It's not just the dissolution of relationships that prompt these removals; serious career endeavors and job searches have prompted a desire for full ink removal.

The full removal of a tattoo, especially those that cover a large surface area and have many colors can be a long process and generally doesn't come cheap. Those who opted for a simple black outline when they received their tattoo will be relieved to discover that these are much easier to remove than tattoos with many colors (which currently seem to be more popular than ever). Tattoos with black outlines are at the same depth in the skin as the wavelength used for tattoo removal penetrates which makes for a quicker, less painful process.

Many developments have been made in tattoo removal procedures and continued improvements are on the horizon as the desire for tattoo removal becomes increasingly apparent. Expect to pay for a full removal with basic removals costing around a minimum of $500 though the total cost will entirely depend on size, colors and the ink's depth in the skin.

Dr. Eric Seiger is an experienced board-certified dermatologist and a highly skilled cosmetic surgeon. He has long been a leader in medical education and training, as a faculty member of the prestigious Dermatology Residency Program at Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital. He is the medical director at The Skin & Vein Center with locations throughout the Metro Detroit/Flint, MI areas.

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