Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Men's Health Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Apr 8, 2014 - 3:15:26 PM



Testosterone Therapy Can Damage Brain Health in Caucasian Men

By Staff Editor
Apr 8, 2014 - 3:11:07 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - FORT WORTH, Texas - April 8, 2014 -- Ads touting testosterone replacement therapy are ubiquitous on radio and television. But medical research has determined that its success at enhancing libido may come at a price.


Researchers at University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth report that while testosterone replacement therapy can damage brain health in some Caucasian men, Mexican-Americans appear to be protected from negative effects of the sex hormone.

In Caucasian men with elevated oxidative stress, testosterone replacement therapy raises the risk of damage to brain cells, said Rebecca Cunningham, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Neuroscience. But that's not the case for Mexican-Americans, who do not appear to be affected by oxidative stress.

The findings, published in the April issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, could lead to a better understanding of the role ethnicity plays in brain diseases and cognition.

"Different factors appear to drive dementia," Cunningham said. "And these factors are dependent on the ethnicity of the person."

Oxidative stress, which can determine whether testosterone protects brains cells or damages them, occurs when there are more free radicals produced in the body than antioxidants. Many studies have found between 20 percent and 30 percent of aging men have no response or a negative response to testosterone therapy.

"Our study shows that these negative effects occur only in Caucasian men with high oxidative stress," Dr. Cunningham said.

Testosterone therapy can improve libido, but it's not beneficial across the board.

"I would tell Caucasian men to be cautious about taking testosterone, especially if their oxidative stress levels are high," Dr. Cunningham said.

A blood test for oxidative stress, such as homocysteine, can help physicians determine who is a good candidate for testosterone replacement therapy.

Mexican-American men appear to be protected from the deleterious effects, possibly because of higher levels of endogenous antioxidants, which are produced inside the body and act as their own line of defense against free radicals.

###

UNT Health Science Center

The UNT Health Science Center comprises the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, School of Health Professions and the UNT System College of Pharmacy. Key areas of interprofessional strength include aging and Alzheimer's disease, applied genetics, primary care and prevention.

###

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Men's Health
Latest Headlines


+ Daddy Guilt
+ Sperm Shield Fends off Microbes, Helps Preserve Fertility
+ The Biggest Hair Restoration Breakthrough: Robotic Surgery
+ Men's Health and the Environment
+ Father’s Day: 8 Ways for Dads-to-Be to Supercharge Their Fertility
+ Father’s Day: June 15, 2014
+ Cost Can Limit Choice of Erectile Function Drug
+ Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of National Men's Health Week
+ Local Families Give Dad the Gift of Health for Father’s Day, Men’s Health Week
+ Male Infertility Linked to Mortality in Study



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions