Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Heart Health Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Sep 7, 2017 - 10:06:33 PM



Study Estimates Rate of Survival Following Minimally Invasive Repair of Failed Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

By Staff Editor
Jul 8, 2014 - 6:11:04 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - In an analysis of about 460 patients with failed bioprosthetic aortic valves who underwent transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation, overall survival at one year was 83 percent, with survival associated with surgical valve size and mechanism of failure, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA.

Surgical aortic valve replacements increasingly use bioprosthesis (composed of biological tissue) implants rather than mechanical valves. Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation, it is expected that there will be an increase in the number of patients with degeneration of these types of valves. Treatment of patients with failed bioprostheses is a clinical challenge; although reoperation is considered the standard of care, these patients are frequently elderly and have other medical conditions, and repeat cardiac surgery can pose significant illness and risk of death. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach, however a comprehensive evaluation of survival after the procedure has not previously been performed, according to background information in the article.

Danny Dvir, M.D., of St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, and colleagues evaluated survival of 459 patients after transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation inside failed surgical bioprosthetic valves using a multinational registry. The patients (average age, 78 years) underwent implantation between 2007 and May 2013 at 55 centers.

Reasons for bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (narrowing of the valve opening; 39.4 percent), regurgitation (backflow of blood through the orifice of the valve due to imperfect closing; 30.3 percent), and combined stenosis and regurgitation (30.3 percent). The overall 1-year survival rate was 83.2 percent.

Patients in the stenosis group had worse 1-year survival (76.6 percent) in comparison with the regurgitation group (91.2 percent) and the combined group (83.9 percent). Similarly, patients with small valves (≤ 21 mm) had worse 1-year survival (74.8 percent) compared with larger valves.

"Thorough assessment of candidates for valve-in-valve implantation is a key step to obtain optimal results. The current analysis highlights the need for meticulous evaluation of bioprosthesis mechanism of failure before attempting a valve-in-valve procedure," the authors write.
(doi:10.1001/jama.2014.7246)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

# # #

For ad rates, call Mike McCurdy at 877-634-9180 or email at [email protected]  We have over 7,000 journalists who are subscribers.



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Heart Health
Latest Headlines


+ Saving Hearts After a Heart Attack
+ Mouse Studies Shed Light on How Protein Controls Heart Failure
+ Pregnancy-Related Heart Failure Strikes Black Women Twice as Often as Those of Other Races
+ Frequent Sauna Bathing Keeps Blood Pressure in Check
+ The Biology of Mending a Broken Heart
+ Delayed Diagnosis, Not Gender Affects Women’s Treatment for Heart Disease
+ Post Heart Attack: How Can Scar Tissue Be Turned Back Into Healthy Heart Muscle?
+ Treating Irregular Heartbeats
+ Genetic Testing Can Help Determine Safest Dose of Common Blood Thinner
+ Gene Therapy Improved Left Ventricular and Atrial Function in Congestive Heart Failure by up to 25 Percent



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions