Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Heart Health Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Jul 7, 2016 - 5:36:25 PM



Heart Shaped Foods Good for Your Ticker

By Staff Editor
Feb 10, 2014 - 10:23:38 AM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - ST. LOUIS -- While some dietitians extol the virtues of red wine, dark chocolate and salmon to celebrate Valentine's Day and the month of February the heart healthy way, Katie Eliot, Ph.D., assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University, has a different plan.

Keep it simple. Look to heart shaped foods to protect your heart.

"Being red and heart shaped can be a tip off that some foods are good for your heart," Eliot says. "Many heart shaped fruits and vegetables are great sources of antioxidants. These compounds act like shields, taking the hit from free radicals that otherwise damage the body and cause heart disease and cancer."

For instance, strawberries and raspberries are loaded with vitamin C and an antioxidant known as polyphenol that prevents plaque from forming. Cherries contain an antioxidant called anthocyanin, which is thought to protect the blood vessels, and is high in potassium, which lowers blood pressure.

Tomatoes and red peppers are rich in the antioxidant lycopene, which is in many red fruits and vegetables and works magic by neutralizing free radicals. And acorn squash and apples contain loads of fiber, which reduces bad cholesterol that can clog up your arteries to cause heart attacks and stroke.

So, while the current recommendation is to eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day, Eliot adds a special suggestion for February.

"To help keep your ticker ticking, celebrate heart month and Valentine's Day by making sure at least two of those five fruits and veggies are heart shaped or red," Eliot says. "It's a happy coincidence that many of these foods actually resemble the organ they help to protect."

Long a leader in educating health professionals, Saint Louis University offered its first degree in an allied health profession in 1929. Today the Doisy College of Health Sciences offers degrees in physical therapy, athletic training education, clinical laboratory science, nutrition and dietetics, health informatics and information management, health sciences, medical imaging and radiation therapeutics, occupational science and occupational therapy, and physician assistant education. The college's unique curriculum prepares students to work with health professionals from all disciplines to ensure the best possible patient care.

##
For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Heart Health
Latest Headlines


+ Skin Cell Model Advances Study of Genetic Mutation Linked to Heart Disease, Stroke Risk
+ Accentuate the Positive to Reduce Risk of Chronic Disease
+ Hi-Tech Vest May Help Keep Heart Failure Patients Out of Hospital
+ Drones Can Increase Survival from Cardiac Arrest
+ Many Athletes with Implantable Defibrillators Can Do Sports
+ 1 in 6 Taking Blood-Thinning Drugs May Not Be Getting Right Dose
+ Scientists Identify Protein Linked to Chronic Heart Failure
+ Eating Chocolate May Decrease Risk of Irregular Heartbeat
+ Genes Responsible for Severe Congenital Heart Disease Identified
+ Preterm Birth Linked to Higher Risk of Heart Failure



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions