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Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Sep 7, 2017 - 10:06:33 PM



Living With Cancer: Ovary Removal Surgery

By Staff Editor
Jul 14, 2017 - 12:03:24 PM



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(HealthNewsDigest.com) - During oophorectomy surgery you'll receive anesthetics to put you in a sleep-like state. You won't be awake during the procedure.

An oophorectomy can be performed two ways:

  • Laparotomy. In this surgical approach, the surgeon makes one long incision in your lower abdomen to access your ovaries. The surgeon separates each ovary from the blood supply and tissue that surrounds it and removes the ovary.
  • Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. In this surgical approach, the surgeon makes three or four very small incisions in your abdomen.

    The surgeon inserts a tube with a tiny camera through one incision and special surgical tools through the others. The camera transmits video to a monitor in the operating room that the surgeon uses to guide the surgical tools.

    Each ovary is separated from the blood supply and surrounding tissue and placed in a pouch. The pouch is pulled out of your abdomen through one of the small incisions.

    Laparoscopic oophorectomy may also be robotically assisted in certain cases. During robotic surgery, the surgeon watches a 3-D monitor and uses hand controls that allow finer movement of the surgical tools.

Whether your oophorectomy is an open, laparoscopic or robotic procedure depends on your situation. Laparoscopic or robotic oophorectomy usually offers quicker recovery, less pain and a shorter hospital stay. But these procedures aren't appropriate for everyone, and in some cases, surgery that begins as laparoscopic may need to be converted to an open procedure during the operation.

After oophorectomy

After an oophorectomy, you can expect to:

  • Spend time in a recovery room as your anesthesia wears off
  • Move to a hospital room where you may spend a few hours to a few days, depending on your procedure
  • Get up and about as soon as you're able in order to help your recover
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