Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Feb 5, 2013 - 12:20:03 PM



Finding – and Fighting – the Fat that Fuels Cancer

By Staff Editor
Feb 5, 2013 - 12:17:21 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - DALLAS - Feb. 5, 2013 - Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have made a key observation regarding how fat cells (also referred to as adipocytes) interact with tumor cells and thereby allow a cancer to thrive in dense breast tissue or fatty livers.

Fat cells near tumors secrete a variety of extracellular factors, some of which boost tumor development and progression, the UT Southwestern researchers report in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

The correlation between obesity and various solid and hematological cancers - along with other diseases like diabetes, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular disease - has long been known. The ongoing challenge - and the focus of this latest investigation by Dr. Philipp Scherer, Director of the Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research at UT Southwestern - is to identify which extracellular factors are most important in driving tumor growth and to determine how to target them.

The UTSW research has found that endotrophin is a fat cell-derived extracellular factor that fuels the growth of breast tumors in mice. Working with the lead author, Dr. Jiyoung Park, assistant instructor of internal medicine, Dr. Scherer showed that blocking endotrophin secreted by the rodent's fat cells had a remarkable effect on breast cancer tumors: blocking endotrophin with an antibody not only reduced tumor growth, but also prevented the cancer from metastasizing to other parts of the body.

"Not all fat is bad, but endotrophin happens to be more abundant in unhealthy fat tissue," Dr. Scherer said. "In the context of tumor growth, fat cell-derived endotrophin stimulates the growth of blood vessels that in turn feed cancer cells and enables the tumor to grow more rapidly.

"As we gain weight, we not only have an increased risk of developing cancer, but we also decrease the chance of successfully fighting the tumor," Dr. Scherer said.

The researchers said future efforts will explore various pathological settings to establish whether this blocking approach is a viable strategy in the clinic.

The study received support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, and the Department of Defense Fellowship.

Visit www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/index.html to watch Dr. Scherer discuss his latest research findings. Visit the Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center to learn more about oncology at UT Southwestern, including highly individualized treatments for cancer at the region's only National Cancer Institute-designated center.

 

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the premier medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has many distinguished members, including five who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. Numbering more than 2,700, the faculty is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in 40 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients and oversee nearly 2 million outpatient visits a year.


###

 

For advertising and promotion on www.HealthNewsDigest.com contact Mike McCurdy at: [email protected]  or call 877-634-9180. We are syndicated worldwide and read in 164 countries. We also have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers who may use our content for their own media!

 

 

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Cancer Issues
Latest Headlines


+ Offering Fertility Preservation Option to Young Boys with Cancer
+ What to Anticipate After You’ve Heard Those Dreaded Words ‘you have breast cancer’
+ New Program Offers Help to Women Coping with Recent Breast Cancer Diagnosis
+ UCLA Scientists Unlock Protein that Can Accelerate Recovery in Cancer Patients Following Radiation and Chemotherapy
+ Effects of Arsenic on Cancer Tumor Production
+ Understanding Ovarian Cancer: Know The Facts
+ Genetic Variants That Raise Risk for Prostate Cancer
+ Hereditary Risk of Cancer
+ Cancer-fighting Cocktail for Advanced Cervical Cancer
+ UT Southwestern Researchers Find New Gene Mutations for Wilms Tumor



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions