Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Dec 18, 2013 - 3:26:15 PM



Diet Rich in Tomatoes May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

By Staff Editor
Dec 18, 2013 - 3:19:11 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

Fruits raised levels of hormone involved in regulating blood sugar, fat

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - A tomato-rich diet may help protect at-risk postmenopausal women from breast cancer, according to new research accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Breast cancer risk rises in postmenopausal women as their body mass index climbs. The study found eating a diet high in tomatoes had a positive effect on the level of hormones that play a role in regulating fat and sugar metabolism.

"The advantages of eating plenty of tomatoes and tomato-based products, even for a short period, were clearly evident in our findings," said the study's first author, Adana Llanos, PhD, MPH, who is an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Rutgers University. "Eating fruits and vegetables, which are rich in essential nutrients, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals such as lycopene, conveys significant benefits. Based on this data, we believe regular consumption of at least the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables would promote breast cancer prevention in an at-risk population."

The longitudinal cross-over study examined the effects of both tomato-rich and soy-rich diets in a group of 70 postmenopausal women. For 10 weeks, the women ate tomato products containing at least 25 milligrams of lycopene daily. For a separate 10-week period, the participants consumed at least 40 grams of soy protein daily. Before each test period began, the women were instructed to abstain from eating both tomato and soy products for two weeks.

When they followed the tomato-rich diet, participants' levels of adiponectin - a hormone involved in regulating blood sugar and fat levels - climbed 9 percent. The effect was slightly stronger in women who had a lower body mass index.

"The findings demonstrate the importance of obesity prevention," Llanos said. "Consuming a diet rich in tomatoes had a larger impact on hormone levels in women who maintained a healthy weight."

The soy diet was linked to a reduction in participants' adiponectin levels. Researchers originally theorized that a diet containing large amounts of soy could be part of the reason that Asian women have lower rates of breast cancer than women in the United States, but any beneficial effect may be limited to certain ethnic groups, Llanos said.

Other authors of the study include: J. Peng and M.L. Pennell of the Ohio State University; M.Z. Vitolins of Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, NC; and J.L. Krok, C.R. Degraffinreid and E.D. Paskett of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The study, "Effects of Tomato and Soy on Serum Adipokine Concentrations in Postmenopausal Women at Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Cross-over Dietary Intervention Trial," was published online, ahead of print.

###

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.

 



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Cancer Issues
Latest Headlines


+ Oral Cancer Awareness
+ American Lung Association Interested In Hearing from Smoking Asthmatics
+ Breast Cancer, Mammograms, And The Fear Factor
+ Blood Test Could Provide Rapid, Accurate Method of Detecting Solid Cancers
+ Resistant Leukemias - Experimental Drug Shows Promise for Treatment
+ Blocking DNA Repair Mechanisms Could Improve Radiation Therapy for Deadly Brain Cancer
+ HPV and Cervical Cancer, Taking a New Direction
+ Genetic Testing Beneficial in Melanoma Treatment
+ Adenoma Detection Rates Linked to Colorectal Cancer and Mortality
+ Cell Metabolism Discovery Could Spawn Treatments for Cancer or Common Cold



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions