Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Nov 29, 2012 - 7:11:02 AM



Delayed Treatment for Advanced Breast Cancer Has 'Profound Effect'

By Staff Editor
Nov 21, 2012 - 10:36:15 AM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page
(HealthNewsDigest.com) - COLUMBUS, Ohio – Results from a new study conducted by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James) show women who wait more than 60 days to begin treatment for advanced breast cancer face significantly higher risks of dying than women who start therapy shortly after diagnosis.

Watch Video

“We wanted to see whether delaying treatment affected mortality rates among women with breast cancer,” says Electra D. Paskett, associate director for population sciences at OSUCCC-James. “It’s been shown that early detection and appropriate, timely treatment can increase five year survival rates to as high as 98 percent. Until this study, we didn’t know the profound effect delaying treatment could have,” she said.

Paskett is the senior author on the study, which is published online by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In the study, researchers retrospectively examined 1,786 women enrolled in North Carolina Medicaid system who were diagnosed with breast cancer from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2002, using the linked North Carolina Cancer Registry-Medicaid Claims database. Follow-up data were available through July 31, 2006.The median time from biopsy-confirmed diagnosis to the initiation of treatment was 22 days. Sixty-six percent of the women started treatment within 30 days, and nearly all (90 percent) started treatment within 60 days. There was no difference in survival rates for those treated by 60 days.

However, for one in ten women studied, treatment started more than 60 days after their cancer diagnosis. Among those who had advanced cases of breast cancer, a delay of more than 60 days was associated with an 85 percent higher risk of breast cancer-related death, and a 66 percent higher risk of death overall, compared with women who were treated sooner.

“We’re finding as we do research, it is really the lower income population that suffers the highest burden of all diseases,” says Paskett. “This study suggests that ten percent of women can’t get access to care, or it takes a longer time to get access to care.”

Paskett says interventions to remove barriers and improve the timeliness of breast cancer treatment should focus on late-stage patients. Paskett recently published a study that confirmed patient navigators, often part of the clinical team, help patients negotiate the various complexities of the health care system and play a valuable role in helping breast cancer patients start treatment earlier.

“This research shows we have an opportunity to improve breast cancer outcomes by helping women who are diagnosed at late-stage to get started with treatment sooner,” says Paskett. “Even if the goal of treatment isn’t curative, early treatment seems to prolong survival.”

The study was funded by grant 1R01CA121317 from the National Cancer Institute.

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only seven centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials. The NCI recently rated Ohio State’s cancer program as “exceptional,” the highest rating given by NCI survey teams. As the cancer program’s 228-bed adult patient-care component, The James is a “Top Hospital” as named by the Leapfrog Group and one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

###

For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com please contact Mike McCurdy: [email protected] or 877-634-9180
HealthNewsDigest.com is syndicated worldwide, to thousands of journalists in all media, and health-related websites. www.HealthNewsDigest.com

Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Cancer Issues
Latest Headlines


+ Neuro-oncologists Discover Cancer Cells Can Burn Acetate for Fuel
+ New Year’s Resolution from The Skin Cancer Foundation: DON’T TAN
+ ‘Sugar-Coated’ Microcapsule Eliminates Toxic Punch of Experimental Anti-Cancer Drug
+ A New Strategy for Developing Drugs to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases
+ Bacterial 'Bunches' Linked to Some Colorectal Cancers
+ Signaling Mechanism Could be Target for Survival, Growth of Tumor Cells in Brain Cancer
+ FDA Approves Drug that Extends Survival in the Most Common Type of Lung Cancer
+ Testosterone May Contribute to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth
+ New Drug Combination for Advanced Breast Cancer Delays Disease Progression
+ Toughest Breast Cancer May Have Met Its Match



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions