Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Jan 21, 2014 - 7:57:14 PM



Cervical Cancer and the HPV Vaccine: What Parents Should Know

By Staff Editor
Jan 21, 2014 - 7:51:12 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - BETHESDA, Md., Jan. 21, 2014  -- We can vaccinate our children against chicken pox, measles, and the flu. And more recently a vaccine has become available that lets parents give their children a new leg up against disease--a vaccine to prevent some types of cancer.

We know that a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and some other cancers. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Most HPV infections go away on their own, but long-lasting infections with certain HPV types can lead to cancer.

The good news is that vaccines are available that prevent infection with the HPV types that cause most cervical cancers and other HPV-associated cancers. Vaccination against HPV is especially important for African Americans and Latinos, because these communities have a higher rate of cervical cancer than other populations.

Two HPV vaccines are on the market, Gardasil® and Cervarix®; both are administered in three doses over the course of 6 months. Both vaccines prevent infection with the two most important cancer-causing types of HPV, and Gardasil® also prevents infection with the HPV types that cause most genital warts. Gardasil® is the most commonly available vaccine in the United States. It should be given to both girls and boys between the ages of 11 to 12 (although girls as young as 9 can get the vaccine, as can older boys and girls and young adults who have not previously been vaccinated).

Some parents may feel uncomfortable giving their children an HPV vaccine because the vaccine is used to prevent a sexually transmitted infection. Many parents are understandably hesitant to even think about their children being sexually active. However, the vaccines need to be given before first infection with HPV in order to prevent cancer, so it is important that your child be vaccinated before he or she becomes sexually active. Your child's doctor can give you more information about HPV vaccine options and timing.

Although researchers have made some amazing progress in reducing cancer deaths, cases of some cancers related to HPV have continued to rise. Too few American girls are getting the HPV vaccine. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month--a good time to learn more about vaccination opportunities for your children.

For more information about the HPV vaccine and cervical cancer, you can visithttp://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Prevention/HPV-vaccine

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/cervix

NCI leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce the burden of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI web site at www.cancer.govor call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). More articles and videos in the culturally relevant Lifelines series are available at http://www.cancer.gov/lifelines

Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov

###
For advertising and promotion on HealthNewsDigest.com, call Mike McCurdy: 877-634-9180 or [email protected] We have over 7,000 journalists as subscribers.



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Cancer Issues
Latest Headlines


+ UPMC-Developed Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients
+ Aggressive Tumors Silence Genes that Fight Cancer
+ Cancer and Game Theory
+ Pancreatic Surgery Complications Impact Hospital Costs More Than Length of Stay
+ Depressed Men with Prostate Cancer are Diagnosed with Later Stage Disease Don’t Live as Long as Men who are Not Depressed
+ Advances in Treating Children with Cancer: The CWPW Pediatric Solid Tumor Program
+ Breast Cancer—Men Get It Too
+ New Future for Prostate Cancer
+ Low Dose of Targeted Drug Might Improve Cancer-Killing Virus Therapy
+ Targeted Patient Outreach Can Improve Colon Cancer Screening Rates



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions