Advanced Search
Current and Breaking News for Professionals, Consumers and Media



Click here to learn how to advertise on this site and for ad rates.

Cancer Issues Author: Staff Editor Last Updated: Jul 21, 2014 - 3:16:17 PM



Aggressive Tumors Silence Genes that Fight Cancer

By Staff Editor
Jul 21, 2014 - 3:12:42 PM



Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Ezine
For Email Marketing you can trust


Email this article
 Printer friendly page

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - New Haven, Conn.-A study led by Yale Cancer Center may provide clues to how some aggressive cancers turn off, or silence, genes critical to suppressing tumors. The findings, published in the journal Cell Reports,suggest that this gene silencing process could be interrupted to increase the chances that aggressive tumors will respond to treatment.

As cancer develops, it often outstrips its blood supply and receives less oxygen than normal tissue. This low-oxygen environment, called hypoxia, is associated with aggressive tumors of all types that are more likely to progress despite chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

The study, which used colon cancer tissue, found that hypoxia also triggers the silencing of a critical tumor-suppressing gene called MLH1.

The team also identified an enzyme, LSD1 (lysine specific demethylase), associated with MLH1 that could be a target to reverse or block the silencing process. Since LSD1 is an enzyme, it is possible to target it with small molecules to inhibit its activity.

"We've long known that hypoxic tumors are associated with worse prognoses, but the idea that hypoxic tumors could silence genes was an unexpected finding," said senior author Peter M. Glazer, M.D., the Robert H. Hunter Professor and chair of therapeutic radiology, and professor of genetics at Yale School of Medicine.  "Now that we know how big a role hypoxia plays, we have a new and clinically-relevant path to explore in terms of circumventing this process. The next step is to determine how hypoxia affects other tumor-suppressing genes."

Other authors were first author Yuhong Lu, and Narendra Wajapeyee of Yale School of Medicine; and Mitchell Turker of Oregon Health & Science University.

This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01ES005775).

###

For ad rates, call Mike McCurdy at 877-634-9180 or email at [email protected]  We have over 7,000 journalists who are subscribers.



Top of Page

HealthNewsDigest.com

Cancer Issues
Latest Headlines


+ New Partnership Provides Breast Cancer Patients With Access to More Information on Breast Reconstruction
+ Oral Drug Reduces Formation of Precancerous Polyps in the Colon
+ What’s Your Cancer Risk? Ask Your Genes
+ Advice to Women Considering Preventative Mastectomy
+ Watching My Mother Die of Breast Cancer
+ New Molecule Could Fight Oxidative Stress, Lead to Therapies for Cancer, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease
+ Offering Fertility Preservation Option to Young Boys with Cancer
+ What to Anticipate After You’ve Heard Those Dreaded Words ‘you have breast cancer’
+ New Program Offers Help to Women Coping with Recent Breast Cancer Diagnosis
+ UCLA Scientists Unlock Protein that Can Accelerate Recovery in Cancer Patients Following Radiation and Chemotherapy



Contact Us | Job Listings | Help | Site Map | About Us
Advertising Information | HND Press Release | Submit Information | Disclaimer

Site hosted by Sanchez Productions